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people, educate them, maybe some good of good will come 20 years down the road. >> you mentioned the justice component of many of these islamist parties. this is a response today corruption of these u.s.- sponsored regimes. -- to the corruption of these u.s.-sponsored regimes. for the record, i am against corruption. >> it goes back to the point at bottom made in my remarks that islamists did not win, the non- islamists lost. they lose by screwing up the delivery of services, by being so corrupt, by being ossified. islamists are there, waiting to take advantage of whatever opportunity, through violence or nonviolence. we did not even discuss their relationship with violence and nonviolence, which is a very important issue. they are there like vultures to reap the benefits, the carrion of these regimes. we can build, and we can help them, help the alternatives build better alternatives. >> question in the far corner over there. >> i am with the center for national policy. thank you for the debate. my point here is that there's been a suggestion that once islamists come to power, t
progress forum titled investing in the future, higher education, innovation and american competitiveness. this is 40 minutes. >> it is my great privilege to introduce gene sperling, director of the white house national economic council and assistant the president for economic policy. gene sperling also is a former senior fellow at the center for american progress, pro-growth progressive. and the connection between innovation, education, ensuring we have an economy that works for everyone. i want to say having served in the administration, there is no one in the administration who is more focused on america's long-term competitiveness, short term competitiveness, midterm competitiveness, when the president is talking about issues which are critical to him, america maintains its edges in the global economy, and all of its citizens to students to people dreaming about being the next generation of innovators, policies that helped achieve that. higher education k-12, insuring universities are still leading and citizenry is well s was sub human capital, not the best term. and achieving their d
competitiveness to education. the new number one in most cases, a scandinavian country. what is the secret sauce? we'll dig into it. >>> but first here's my take. as we debate whether the two parties can ever come together and get things done, here's something president obama could probably do by himself that would be a single accomplish money of the his presidency. end the war on tar rohr. for the first time since 9/11 an official has raised the prospect. johnson said in a speech to the oxford last week as the battle against al qaeda continues, there will be come a tipping point at which so many of the leaders and operatives of al qaeda and its affiliates have been killed or captured such that as al qaeda as wi know it has been effectively destroyed. at that point, he says, our efforts should no longer be considered an armed conflict. you might not realize it, but we're still living in a state of war. this is the longest since the civil war, world war i, world war ii. it grants the president and federal government extraordinary authorities, effectively extends civil liberties for anyone the gov
to education, the new number one in most cases a scandinavian country, what is the credit sauce? we'll dig into it. but first here's my take. as we debate whether the two parties can ever come together and get things done, here is something president obama could do probably by himself that would be a single accomplishment of his presidency, end the war on terror. for the first time since 9/11, an administration official has raised this prospect. said in a speech to the oxford union last week, that as the battle against al qaeda continues, there will be come a tipping point as so many of the leaders and operatives of al qaeda have killed or captures such as al qaeda as we know it has been effectively destroyed. our efforts should no lo loaninger -- this is the longest period that the united states has lived in such a situation. longer than the civil war, world war i, world war ii, it grants the government extraordinary authorities and effectively suspends civil liberties for anyone the government deems the minute and also keeps us at a permanent war feeting in all kinds of ways, endsing thi
of the resources to solve the problem. i think we need an education program by learned scholars, such as those in this audience to help us in getting this word out to america. i think it is essential because it is coming on very fast. there are things that are happening that we take for granted. as an example, we take for granted the fact that we can move thousands and thousands of marines, sailors, soldiers and have the equipment without any burden to carry economy, not true. the truth of the matter is is a tremendous burden to our economy to have a national-security policy that defends the country that we love so much. without having the ability and willingness to get out and give the american public forums such as this in helping giving us answers to some of the very difficult questions that they ask, i want to take this opportunity to think robby for what he does. i met him some years ago when he found my office in an office building. he came in and we had a chat and i said, my goodness, this fellow knows what he is talking about and he has never disappointed me whatsoever. what we need to
of an outstanding democrat on the subcommittee on work force protection of the education and labor committee and that is congresswoman lynn woolsey. congresswoman woolsey knows their struggles. four decades ago she was a single working mother supporting three children. she knows about the economic security of families. later as a resource manager she knew things like working families are still fighting for like paid leave, paid sick leave, retirement and health care. serving as chair and ranking member of the work force protection subcommittee, lynn woolsey was instrumental in helping to get the lilly ledbetter fair pay act signed into law and military families dealing with military deployment and injury. lynn woolsey was a partner to ensure coal miners are kept safe and healthy on the job. she went underground in a coal mine with our late colleague donald payne to require firsthand knowledge of how the workplace works and the environment in which those miners go to work every day. in the classroom, lynn woolsey continues to fight for women and working families. she was -- i want to say hars
can see that the situation is actually worse. there's no change with education, with infrastructure or health care. corruption, poverty and hunger haven't decreased. >> lehrer: head of the u.n.'s large haiti missi here acknowledges the slow pace but says there has been some progress on the massive rebuilding task, a much smaller number of tent dwellings since last year, for example. >> if haiti were a glass and it's gone from being 10% full to 15% full, let's recognize that without in anyway diminishing the fact that you've still got 85% of the glass full. >> reporter: but fisher says many of the problems were endemic to haiti long before the earthquake. >> what we've seen is people who are in camps because of enrenched poverty. many o these people were hidden before in slums. they're now in the open in camp. that is a function of underdevelopment? it's a function of weak governance. it's a function of lack of alternative. >> reporter: he says one of the biggest problems is that haiti's government crippled by the quake in a corrupt reputation hasn't been able to lay out national pri
. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. and contributions in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ (trolley dings.) - thanks, trolley! hi, neighbour! it's me, daniel tiger. today i'm going to school! want to come to school with me? grr-ific! come on! - let's put your things in your cubby, big and strong tiger. - i am big
of chicago. that's how it happened. find those 10 people, educate them and maybe some good will come 20 years down the road. >> you mentioned the justice component of a lot of these islamist parties. there's an argument that can be made that this is a response to the corruption of these you sponsored regimes. i would say that in the case of gaza which you mentioned, rob, that was a very series component. any thoughts how to combat that or includes this in the right direction? >> for the record i'm against corruption. [laughter] , good, good, good. >> wanted to clear that up. yes, look. it goes back to the point i thought it made in my remarks that islamists didn't win and non-islamists lost, whether they were the former corrupt regimes or the divisions among the non-islamist parties today, they lose. they lose by screwing up the delivery of services. they lose by being so corrupt. they lose by being ossified. they lose, and i islamists are there like they been for eight years to take advantage of whatever opportunity, violence or through nonviolence. we didn't discuss their relationship with
and investing in early childhood and investing in science and stem education if you are indifferent to whether or not we reduce our budget deficit by simply taking deeper and deeper cuts in domestic discretionary budget. at some point you skip to a point where you are simply treating of between -- trading off between early to childhood and biomedical research and higher education. those are not trade-offs the american public wants us to make. when we talk about getting our fiscal discipline, our fiscal house in order, i want to remind people that when i was here in the early 1990's, one of the clarion calls, one of the reasons people make that case, was that if we had expanding deficits, it wasn't just that we would crowd out private capital. it was that we would crowd out public investment in the future, in children come in modern infrastructure, and innovation. when we decide we agree to cut spending, which we need to as but in larger deficit reduction. those of you who care about innovation need to care about how you cut, how did this spending. -- how you do spending. we have cut domestic d
with the education of little kids teaching them to hate israel and everything that it stands for and hope to have support from the people when you make a deal like that. so there are a lot of conditions for this to work, and it can't happen overnight. so as i said, part of the problem is they've created their own problem for acceptance of any kind of a reasonable deal. >> you expressed some pessimism or realism about what's likely to happen in afghanistan after the departure of substantial numbers of u.s. troops that'll be back, essentially, to where it was before 9/11. what happens to pakistan after that which is islamist, which is semi-democratic but with the emphasis on the semi and, of course, is nuclear armed? >> this just adds to the conundrum of the entire area and how we deal with it. and i go back to where i started. if you have some first principles that you try to apply in any controversy and recognize that as you apply them, there will be circumstances where some nuance and potential compromise is required, then you approach all of these problems that way. if you have very good intell
' including closing the educational achievement gap. the lofty goals may have to wait as lawmakers and the president toppled a number of issues that cannot wait. let's go back to the inauguration from generic 20, 2009, a few hundred feet from where we are at as he addressed the nation. he will do so again january next year. this is what he said nearly four years ago. [video clip] >> we must dust ourselves off and begin the work of remaking america. [applause] everywhere we look, there is work to be done. the state of our economy calls for action bold and swift. we will react to lay a new foundation for growth. electrical grids that bind us together. we will restore science to its rightful place and raise health care quality and lower cost. we will harness the sun and the wind to run our factories and will transform our schools and colleges to meet the demands of a new age. all of this we can do. all of this we will do. there are some who question the scale of our ambitions to suggest our system cannot tolerate too many big plans. their memories are short. they have forgotten what t
from steve cook, head of the michigan education association was a guest on our program. the union leadership was working, meeting with governor schneider and he said no the last thing i want is -- i don't want to split this state the way they did in wisconsin and ohio. no no, no. i don't want anything to do with that. i want to work together with the unions. i don't want anything to do with this rumors that they might try to pass some so-called right-to-work legislation in michigan. they met for like about ten days and then on friday, the republican-controlled legislature forced through -- get this now -- with no public hearings no debate on the floor, no members of the public allowed to testify for it or against it, no members of the public even allowed in the state capitol building when they passed this bill it would make michigan the 24th state to have the so-called right-to-work legislation on the books. they forced it through and then rick sha nidor in a total turnaround, a total flip-flop a total doubl
investments in the future. it takes investment in equipment and science education and infrastructure and so forth. the question many people don't want to consider is when we get those resources? i asked our research department of the would make a prediction from important the interest costs would be if we did nothing and the estimate without any explosion will was as follows. within 25 years or so, our interest costs would jump from about 1% of gdp to 12% of gdp or roughly four times the total investment made in r&d r&d fer, science jaish infrastructure. and if we ever permit that to happen, we will assure that we are going to have what i call a slow-growth crisis. please take over, this is your meeting. >> one thing i don't plan to be is an economics expert. i felt this way for years it's not just about the health of our economy, it's about around the world it's going to continue to eat at us and when you put in the kind of time bombs of was the intent. it was supposed to be so hammes that congress would never permit it to happen. it's stretched and stressed at the time. i'm one that set
security and education and you want to rein in the entitlement programs. action reform an entitlement reform -- we are not fixing entitlements, cutting core government functions. host: we have been john on the phone on the republican line from maryland. caller: good morning. i don't hear anybody talking about the real problem that we have in the united states. you cannot go into a store in the united states and buy american products. toyou don't put the people work, you cannot pay taxes. fore got men in jail murdering 15 or 20 people and we feed and clothe them all year. i don't understand it. host: thank you for the call. take a look of the budget and draw a say eie. where does the money go? guest: most of the money are the things that have put in place where you get benefits regardless, social security, medicare, and medicaid. national security and basic spending on the fans an annual preparations for education, health, and the upper structure are a small fraction. we are seeing the baby boomers retire and we have seen health care spending rise. that combination is very powerful on
those who come to us about improving our roads, providing medical research, supporting education, whatever your interest, those interests are receiving less support than they have before, and they will continue to receive less support to the point where they may receive no support because the mandatory is projected with the baby boom retirement of accelerating to points which our country simply cannot afford, it will drive us into bankruptcy. so if the package that is brought down, hopefully, from the white house or if we do not address in this body the spending issue that incorporates the restructuring for the preservation of medicare, medicaid, and social security, but also with the realization that unless we do something those programs are going to go bankrupt, have severe impacts on those who are currently receiving those benefits. unless we do that, we will not have a credible package. senator wyden and i have proposed comprehensive tax reform as something that needs to be done, regulatory form is something that i support. but if we don't acknowledge that the final package p
retired educators in california who had pensions of more than $100,000 a year, okay. that's 700,000 of them in 2005. in 2011, there were 5,400 retired educators who had pensions of over $100,000 a year. >> greta: california is in deep trouble. >> deep trouble. >> i don't think in this country people are ever going to work towards solving these problems when we do these hits on different people. i mean, this is like the rich are so bad, they're urinating on the poor. >> yeah. >> greta: you know, no matter how we resolve or how we work towards resolving things, when you declare war. >> it's really inflammatory and ataghtattracts a lot of attenti. it was narrated by ed asner, by the way, the liberal actor. it obscures the fact of how wealthy the unions are. from the city journal article, in the last decade, the teachers unions spent more on politics in the last decade than the oil industry and the pharmaceutical industry and the tobacco industry combined. >> greta: don't they worry with the bad situation economically in california, and they're in a really tough situation, don't you
're serious about reducing our deficit, while still investing in things like education and research that are important to growing our economy, and if we're serious about protecting middle class families, we're also going to have to ask the wealthiest americans to pay higher tax rates. that's one wrins pal i won't compromise on. >> good saturday morning to you, mike. >> hi, alex. >> let's talk about the time line. is there a realistic one in which this can all get done by the beginning of the year? >> i think there is, alex. i think people know the parameters of the year. it's just can they get there, do they have the political will to get there. more importantly, alex, do they have the votes to get there in the house of representatives. you heard the president. he says no compromise on this issue of raising taxes for the wealthy. there's one glimmer of hope, how much to hike taxes. as you know, clinton tax rates for wealthiest americans were 39.6%. that's what's going to happen at the beginning of the year. right now they are 35%. the president has been insisting all along those rat
, angered by her campaign for edls' education in pakistan. doctors say malala is doing well. tin united states is starting to run out of family doctors. according to the association of american medical colleges, many re retiring and few are taking foir places. it warns by 2020, the shortage acut reach 45,000. the cure may be found where the .roblem is most acute-- down on the farm. .arry petersen reports. >> reporter: 80-year-old dr. earl merkel has been practicing in rural kansas for more than half a century. >> we had people come to the aror and beg me not to quit. ew deporter: but it's hard recruiting new doctors for the lart of america's heart land. o kansas, 97 of its 105 counties are considered underserved. five counties have no doctor at all. >> it's scary because we don't ysve as many physicians as we need. o reporter: so the university of kansas opened up a branch of its medical school in salina, iat it calls the smallest itdical school in america. it's now on its second class of eight students. >> i cannot wait to bond with the people and feel a sense of belonging. >> reporter
a year. see how i did that? alabama education, i don't need no chart. >> you had a bunch of pretenders come out and they were copies of rush limbaugh. they were idiots. a guy like bill hewitt does. some other people. >> interesting. >> what's so interesting? what i'm saying. >> americans are living longer with fewer deaths from heart disease and cancer and more chronic illnesses and obesity is a problem and they're living longer sick sneer i was in the middle of a conversation. she does not care. i was hijacked. >> this is about winning. for too long, i think there are people more focused on making lots of money than they have about electing conservatives. >> yes. >> local markets are glutted with wannabes. >> it all started, limbaugh was like the guy that broke the ground and everybody said, oh, i want to be like him, whether they believed it or not. >> joe, you can't object to a free market economy. >> i don't object. >> getting paid what they're worth. >> i have no problem with some jackal out there that doesn't believe or doesn't understand about friedman or a thing about true cons
for leading the antiapartheid movement. federal education researchers said today that elementary school students in this country have improved their science and math scores, but they're still behind some countries, especially in asia. south korean fourth graders topped the science list with the united states in seventh place. in math, singapore is number one while american fourth graders ranked 11th. while there's no lack of science or math at the air force, apparently. at cape canaveral today the air force launched a mini shuttle, a space plane called the x-37b. it looks like the old shuttle but it's about a quarter of the size and apparently it's unmanned. the mission today is top secret, but the last time the air force launched one of these space planes it stayed in orbit for 15 months. among the holiday decorations all over america, there are none more special than these. where they came from is a story in itself. next. next. not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [
no leadership capable of making a deal. you cannot start with the education of little kids, teaching them to hate israel and everything that it stands for, and hope to have support from the people when you make a deal like that. there are a lot of conditions for this to work. it cannot happen overnight. as i said, part of the problem is that have created their own problem for acceptance of any kind of a reasonable deal. >> express some realism about what is likely to happen in afghanistan after the departure of substantial numbers of u.s. troops. we'll be back essentially to where it was before 9/11. what happens to pakistan after that? it is semi-democratic. >> this just adds to the conundrum of the entire area and how we deal with it. i go back to where i started. if you have some first principles that you try to apply in any controversy and recognize that as to apply them, there will be certain -- circumstances were some send potential compromise is required, the new approach of these problems that way. if you have very good intelligence, you understand better what is going on within t
paying deficit while still investing in education and research that are important to growing our economy and if we are serious about protecting middle class families then we are going to have to ask the wettiest americans to pay higher tax rates. that's one principle i won't compromise on. >> higher tax rate, of course, at issue and whether or not as republicans had hoped they could just close loopholes and tax deductions and that could. >> he keep say the wealthiest americans but $250,000 that's not the wealthest of america. >> right. so there was some word during the campaign when joe biden let slip that $1 million would be the threshold for which they would begin to tax the wealthest americans. marco rubio on a saturday morning addressed as well. they are going after each other. senator marco rubio and president obama in these dueling addresses. >> we must get the national debt under control. taxes will not solve our 16 trillion-dollar debt. only economic growth and form of entitlement programs will control the debt. woe must reform the job killing tax code by getting rid of unjustif
education money and school money. so they have taken those off the table, which leads maybe cost of living adjustment on medicare and social security. and not much else. so, i think that is where we are now. >> jeff, from your reporting where do you get a sense of where we're headed in this. >> troubling sign of the message of closed door meeting where speaker boehner said the members should leave their christmas decorations up. and that they should plan to stay in. i think that one channel for speaker boehner here, he is beginning to face some rumblings of trouble on the right. so far, i think they have been able to do a good job holding everyone together on this. some are members of the house republican caucus that were outspoken after this closed door meeting, telling reporters that speaker boehner, you know is responsible for this. is not negotiating a hard enough. so he has problems on both planks. i think that, i think there is still time. it's december 12, i guess. so i think that by the end of the week, you know, there isn't sort of some more agreement it's a problem. i still think
people without disabilities. across the world, people with disabilities have for help, lower educational achievement, less economic participation, and higher rates of poverty and people without disabilities. this unacceptable situation must change. >> california has formalized its refusal to ensure the enforcement of federal effort begin immigration requests. on tuesday, attorney general kamala harris said state agencies are not required to -- comply with the program known as secure communities, where local authorities share fingerprints with immigration officials. the program led to the record deportation of around 400,000 people last year. striking care for workers at the port of los angeles and long beach have reached a tentative agreement after an eight-day walkout. workers went on strike last week against international corporations who they say are outsourcing good paying jobs. the strike cost southern california a reported $8 billion in lost economic activity and marked the worst disruption of local cargo traffic in a decade. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and pe
is research and education campaign to insure that the people that are under the influence of any drug do not get behind the wheel. melissa: now that you're legalizing it in places the use will grow. so the incidence will grow and we have a lot more area to test what could possibly happen. that makes me nervous as a driver. rebecca, i will give you last word. >> 10,800 people killed drinking and driving. 40,000 people died because of alcohol. 400,000 died because of smoking. the numbers for marijuana are incredibly low. you can't overdose. you don't get cancer from it. and i --. melissa: i hear you, rebecca. we don't want to add to any of those numbers. one more [raul talking at once]. we've got to leave it there. thanks to our pot power panel. you were all fantastic. hope you come back. >>> bizarre warnings from syria's regime. they claim it could be framed for using chemical weapons. there are unconfirmed reports their use may have already begun. we'll talk about that next. >>> this made i grateful riding in a chrysler, right? remember the workers that were caught boozing and looked lik
. it was really rough time. so i pursued a higher education for my masters. i found mentors who worked in various financial services that attracted me to the industry. personal friend of mind told me the 100,000 jobs mission was launching and convinced me to attend a job fair. melissa: do you think vets make good employees? >> absolutely. we have tangible and intangible skills we bring. intangibles, leadership, discipline, ability to work with a team. situational awareness which is very important in business. and tangibles the military is project-based, process oriented. we have a lot of respect for policies and procedures. melissa: you know about getting a task and finishing it over the finish line and staying committed. >> yes. melissa: you find that vets have a hard time getting jobs and fitting back in, is that your experience. >> we have unconventional path for one choosing the military. when we get out of the military we have to find the best way to integrate. the best way to do that is knowing what you want, what you want to pursue as a career and find companies looking to hire you. meliss
is good at any cost. education, this thing called college. wherever you studied, whatever you went, whatever you did there at any price is good and that is dangerous. melissa: money is available anyone feels like they can go out and get a loan. they're really worried about choosing a college based on price. choose it based on everything else. that is nice in a world where college is free but it's not. >> you're not helping students if you give everybody the subsidies. the colleges over the years are good at pocketing that, raising tuition prices. this is one market where it has grown, the prices have grown faster than health care. not just faster than inflation but runaway costs. >> you really believe that is true? i say that to people all the time. all it is doing is driving up price of college. people can afford it. market will bear it. colleges know the money is out there. students can bear it f we clam down on student loan debt would fewer people go to college because money wasn't available or would colleges lower their prices? they wouldn't do that? >> at least you see restrai
last month. it is a way to get more state funding for education. this law. california's entrepreneurs particularly hard. hereto explained how, even anderson. he is a former google guys. good to see you. >> hello. thank you for having me spew forth the top tax rate in the country will now be in the state of california, assuming we go back to the 39.6% rate. it is retroactive to the beginning of the year. how crazy is that? >> it is, i think, it is very unusual. it is the first time i have ever seen a retroactive tax. one of the things i think was really surprising to me and a lot of my friends is it really was not described that way in the voter guide which was sent to all of us. they neglected to mention the rector active portion of it. i think a lot of people were really surprised by that. so many businesses still get started in silicon valley because that is where the talent is. the regulation, state and higher taxes in the state do not matter. will this really start to hurt business formation there, do you think. >> i think that is a great question. it is about a 30% tax increase c
equipment, in r&d, in science education and infrastructure and so forth. the question many people, sir, don't want to consider is where do we get those resources with those enormous debts? i asked our research department if they would make a reasonable prediction of how important interest costs would be if we did nothing, and their estimate without any explosion in interest rates was as follows: within 25 years or so, our interest costs would jump from about 1% of the gdp to 12% of the gdp or roughly four times the total investment made in r&d, science education and infrastructure. and if we ever permit that to happen, we will have assured that we're going to have what i call a slow growth crisis. and that's at least my way of formulating what happens if we don't do anything. but, mike, please, take over. this is your meeting, not mine. >> well, one of the things i don't claim to be here is an economics expert, although it's from a national security standpoint, and i've felt this way for years, that it's not just about the health of our economy, it's around the world, it's the health of eco
was involved in. >> absolutely. >> even dealing with kids and health and education and all the things. what really inspired her? what drove her? >> it is a remarkable -- 100 organizations. they say countless thousands of individuals that she helped along the way either through those groups or individually dispensing advice, money, you know, helping people out. the work she did with the hospitals was huge. the children's hospital in melbourne, a research center as well. i think it gives the answer to your question was she said when she was 99 she said looking out for people is the most important thing in life and is the most rewarding. happiness, i think, lies in thought for other people and trying to help them. i mean, whenever you think of rupert murdock or whatever else, this was a lovely lady. >> what does she think of her son's endeavors in the media and all the controversy around the empire? >> she was proud of all her kids. i actually knew rupert murdock's daughter, elizabeth, who was named after dame elizabeth too, and she used to speak fondly of her grandmother. this was 20 years ag
the possibility of democrats, who were doing things based on conservative ideas in the area of education, welfare, medicaid and so forth, and take all of that and elevate it and publicize it. his background, really, is in marketing. he ran a marketing company before politics, and he admits quite frankly that in the last election the conservative movement really didn't do an adequate job of explaning its ideas contributing to the losses nay took in the last election. >> senator demint had a great relationship with the tea party groups. what's that mean for the groups with the senator moving to ahead heritage? >> i think it means, bill, that he may try to take them to the next level. no one would dispute, i don't think, that the tea party has, schal we say, communication problems, and if their basic idea was to reduce the level of public spend k and in the states, i think that using the force of the analysis that senator demint and analysts at harming have at their di poe sal is there is the pos protect of the conservative movement becoming more understanding to the largely public. what can you tal
d from the university of chicago. that's how it happened. it was like 10 guys. i miss 10 people, educate them and maybe some good will come 20 years down the road. >> you know you mentioned the justice component of a lot of islamist parties. there's an argument that can be made that this is response to the corruption of these u.s. sponsored regimes and in the case of gaza, which he mentioned was a very serious component. any thoughts on how to combat that were placed in the right direction? >> for the record, i am against corruption. i just wanted to clear that up. yes, look, it goes back to the point i thought i made in my remarks that islamists didn't win. i'm not islamists lost, whether they were the former corrupt regimes or divisions among the non-islamist parties today, they lose. they lose they screwing up the delivery of services. in this by being so corrupt. they lose and islamists are there like they've been for 80 years, waiting to take advantage of whatever opportunity through violence or nonviolence. we didn't even discuss their relationship with violence and nonviolence, wh
the u.s. not necessarily people but the education for producing. >> now, you see, i disagree with that. the skills are here americans can make these products. they can make them as good and better earn anybody in the entire world. we have a great skilled workforce. if they are not teaching some of those skills here, that's easy to fix. and way back in the days when i used to work with jerry brown, we talked about finding the skills that companies need for their special products, you know, computers or iphones or wind turbins or solar panels or whatever and making sure to be teaching those skills in our community colleges and vocational schools. you have to marry the two. but clearly, with that, americans can certainly do those jobs. but that's just one little point of difference here i think this is great news. let us know what you think about it 866-55-press. i will be damn honest with you. as a liberal and saz a progressive, i have been really feeling guilty about all of my apple stuff. i bought two ipads at christmas last year, one for each of our s
of it is of their own making. you cannot start with the education of the kids, teaching them to aid israel and everything it stands for and hope to have support from the people when you make a deal like that. so there are a lot of conditions . it can't happen overnight. so does the central part of the problem is they created their own problem for acceptance of any kind of reasonable deal. >> expressed some pessimism or realism about what is likely to happen in afghanistan after the departure of substantial numbers of u.s. troops. there will be back, a senseless, to where it was before september 11th. what happens in pakistan after that? democratic, emphasis on semi. >> this just adds to the conundrum of the entire area and how we deal with it. i go back to where i started. if you have some first principles that you try to apply in any controversy and recognize that as you apply them there will be circumstances for some nuance and potential compromise has required, then you approached all of these problems the way. you have very good intelligence. you can understand what is going on with in
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constituents or colleagues, he striving strio educate with facts, weaved, andh facts, with evidence, and with the truth. none of us has ever heard jon try to win an argument by belittling or berating an opponent. it is simply not in his characteristic to do so. mr. president, it has been said that a politician thinks of the next election a statesman of the next generation. this statesman of arizona expresses his philosophy of government and the obligation of government leaders this way: quote "we owe future generations the chance to live their dreams, to be successful, and, most important, to achieve true happiness by their own efforts." end quote. senator jon kyl's commitment to the security of our nation, to fiscal responsibility, and to helping those in need have earned him a reputation that is worthy of his characteristic. the people of arizona and america are grateful for his service, and i am thankful for his guidance over the years and for his friendship. we wish him all the best to come in the years before him. mr. president, there is one more tribute that i'd like to give t
services social workers and other relationship that allows them to do with this tough issues in an educated way and resources to help. i think that is where we look at our responsibility is to help them navigate that decision. it's a personal decision and a hard decision about that decision be the family members and provider. we are believers that hospice, especially in circumstances that is not promising is the right way to do it. so you take it from a cost discussion to quality-of-life discussion. when you make the quality-of-life discussion, the cost discussion will bear out there. >> if i understand your point, it is that integrated care is what is going to lead to efficiencies to eliminate waste and bring down cost of the entire health care system. >> you probably just answer the question you're trying to ask me 50 different times. >> but devil is in the details. who's going to answer these questions to better care is provided or not? in less than someone ago that ensure insurance come in as we had to go to a primary care doctor to get permission to go to a specialist. is it the primar
into it growing so quickly and having more success i believe educating the public, in bringing more people in than my tours -- my hundreds of different presentations ever did. it's exactly what brings people in. instead of choosing one solution over another. i don't think it's at all alienating. on the contrary. it's working. pushing the envelope. i would also say that it is -- these social movements that change the international consensus, the international consensus is not like a ready-made box that has always been there. it's something that changes over time and that's what we're part of doing. and the last thing i would say in terms of the victory thing exaggerated. first of all, as i said in my opening comments, bds is a lot about education, and like i said, i believe we have achieved a lot with bds in that way. and galvanizing people, et cetera. to say it hasn't worked, look at israeli newspapers. this movement is perceived as more challenging to the status quo than any diplomatic lip service by obama or un resolutions or anything ever did. we see it now mentioned regularly in the "new york
transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. i'd like to thank eating right, whole grain, multigrain cheerios! mom, are those my jeans? [ female announcer ] people who choose more whole grain tend to weigh less than those who don't. multigrain cheerios . >>> welcome back to weekends with alex witt. i'm thomas roberts. itis time for the strategy talk. have president obama and speaker boehner argued themselves into a corner on this fiscal cliff? >> the president has a clear, simple position. he wants to prove he can dominate by getting the rates up. either you are going to go over the cliff or find some kind of dramatic concession for the president. >> how does boehner give on rates. he said i oppose tax rate increases because tax rate increases cost american jobs. that gives you no room to give on rates. >> joining me now is former vermont governor and howard dean and republican strategist. general tmen, it's great to have you hear. if both president oba
that's very unfortunate because if you think about it, too often the educational system is all about the adults. what we've tried to really focus in here in michigan and leading message i've been sharing is let's get focused on the kids. the kids should come first. we need to be focused on student growth. so to see schools shutting down because of an issue like this is not appropriate, in my view. those kids need a great education and it shouldn't be about adult issues. it should be about issues focused on children. >> steve: great point. you got a busy day. we thank you for dropping by and telling us what's going on in michigan. thank you, sir. >> thank you. >> gretchen: coming up on our show, i'm going to let you say this. >> eric: coming up on -- >> steve: coming up on this show, remember that funny guy in "16 candles"? >> what's happening, hot stuff? >> steve: now that guy is teaming up with billy crystal for some parental guidance. he joins us live next. >> gretchen: first, let's check in with martha mccal lull for what's coming up at the top of the hour. good morning, martha. >
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